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  1. Lesson One - Pre-reading

    The Power of Prereading - Part One
  2. The Power of Prereading - Part Two
  3. The Power of Prereading - Part Three
  4. The Power of Prereading - Part Four
  5. The Power of Prereading - Part Five
  6. Lesson Two - Single Tasking
    Single Tasking - Part One
  7. Single Tasking - Part Two
  8. Single Tasking - Part Three
  9. Single Tasking - Part Four
  10. Single Tasking - Part Five
  11. Lesson Three - Recognition and Recall
    Recognition and Recall - Part One
  12. Recognition and Recall - Part Two
  13. Recognition and Recall - Part Three
  14. Recognition and Recall - Part Four
  15. Recognition and Recall - Part Five
  16. Lesson Four - Question Logging
    Question Logging - Part One
  17. Question Logging - Part Two
  18. Question Logging - Part Three
  19. Question Logging - Part Five
  20. Question Logging - Part Four
  21. Lesson Five - The Testing Effect
    The Testing Effect - Part One
  22. The Testing Effect - Part Two
  23. The Testing Effect - Part Three
  24. The Testing Effect - Part Four
  25. The Testing Effect - Part Five
  26. Lesson Six - Taking Notes
    Taking Notes - Part One
  27. Taking Notes - Part Two
  28. Taking Notes - Part Three
  29. Lesson Seven - Foundational Learning
    Foundational Learning - Part One
  30. Foundational Learning - Part Two
  31. Foundational Learning - Part Three
  32. Foundational Learning - Part Four
  33. Foundational Learning - Part Five
  34. Lesson eight - Deep Learning
    Deep Learning - Part One
  35. Deep Learning - Part Two
  36. Deep Learning - Part Three
  37. Deep Learning - Part Four
  38. Deep Learning - Part Five
  39. Lesson nine - High Yield Learning
    High Yield Learning - Part One
  40. High Yield Learning - Part Two
  41. High Yield Learning - Part Three
  42. High Yield Learning - Part Four
  43. High Yield Learning - Part Five
  44. Lesson ten - The Testing Effect
    The Testing Effect - Part One
  45. The Testing Effect - Part Two
  46. The Testing Effect - Part Three
  47. The Testing Effect - Part Four
  48. The Testing Effect - Part Five
  49. Lesson eleven - active and passive learning
    Active and Passive Learning - Part One
  50. Active and Passive Learning - Part Two
  51. Active and Passive Learning - Part Three
  52. Active and Passive Learning - Part Four
  53. Active and Passive Learning - Part Five
  54. Lesson twelve - Study Blocking
    Study Blocking - Part One
  55. Study Blocking - Part Two
  56. Study Blocking - Part Three
  57. Study Blocking - Part Four
  58. Study Blocking - Part Five
  59. Lesson thirteen - Linking
    Linking - Part One
  60. Linking - Part Two
  61. Linking - Part Three
  62. Linking - Part Four
  63. Linking - Part Five
  64. Lesson fourteen - Interleaving
    Interleaving - Part One
  65. Interleaving - Part Two
  66. Interleaving - Part Three
  67. Interleaving - Part Four
  68. Interleaving - Part Five
  69. Lessons fifteen - Application Questioning
    Application Questioning - Part One
  70. Application Questioning - Part Two
  71. Copy of Application Questioning - Part Three
  72. Application Questioning - Part Four
  73. Application Questioning - Part Five
  74. Lesson Sixteen - Using Tables
    Tables - Part One
  75. Tables - Part Two
  76. Tables - Part Three
  77. Tables - Part Four
  78. Tables - Part Five
Lesson 58 of 78
In Progress

Study Blocking – Part Five

Stoicable July 13, 2022

Recap

Study Blocking

When deciding what structure works best for your study blocks, decide what works best for you. It will usually change depending on what you are doing.

50 minutes is usually a good interval to start with. See how it works for you.

Whenever you have a learning task, you might realise that it takes some time to begin, usually 5 to 10 minutes. This is because once you start the timer, most tasks require some setup before you can really get into them.

If you find yourself needing some time to warm up to a task, it’s best to keep your study blocks a little longer – between 40-60 minutes is ideal.

Your interval breaks are the smaller breaks between your study blocks. These function to reset your focus before your next study block without losing your momentum.

The best amount of time is 10 minutes, with a range of between 5 and 15 minutes. Any shorter than this, and it’s not enough time to reset. Any longer, and you’re going to be less likely to return, especially if you’ve just begun.

Your meaningful breaks are the larger breaks after completing multiple study blocks.

A quick rule of thumb is that your meaningful break should be at least the same length of time as one of your study blocks.

Lesson Cards

Study Blocking

Card 1

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Key Idea

40 – 60 minutes is the ideal length of time for an extended learning break.

Card 2

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Key Idea

According to science, the anticipation of a reward tends to make us happier than the actual reward. In other words, don’t skip your extended breaks. They keep your motivation and focus elevated during your study blocks.

Card 3

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Key Idea

Action creates momentum when learning. When you can’t bear to begin a task, see if you can manage 5 minutes. When the time is up, you will discover it’s more doable than you thought. Action is the key.

Card 4

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Key Idea

When deciding what structure works best for your study blocks, decide what works best for you. It will usually change depending on what you are doing.

Card 5

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Key Idea

With training, you can improve the time you’re able to effectively focus for. With practice, you can quickly reach an hour.

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